Eisa

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https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Eisa_(dance)#Popular_style

Creative Eisa

The 1980s saw the beginning of a new style of Eisa, called “creative Eisa” or “club team Eisa,” which holds many distinctions from traditional forms of Eisa. Whereas traditionally Eisa groups consist of people from a village or community due to the sacredness of the activity in honoring the ancestors of a specific community, creative Eisa teams are usually independent of local communities, and admit anyone regardless of their heritage. Creative Eisa is characterized largely by its song selection, with groups usually choosing to dance to newer songs, rather than the traditional standards. Hidekatsu, a Taketomi-born Ryukyu music artist, has become one of the most popular artists that creative Eisa groups dance to. His hit song, Mirukumunari, has become one of the most frequently performed creative Eisa dances. Hidekatsu is unique in that his songs are almost entirely sung in the Ryukyu languages, which is a marked departure from most modern day Ryukyu pop singers, who sing primarily in Japanese, making Hidekatsu’s music a vital link for young modern Ryukyuans to the languages of their ancestors, who otherwise receive little exposure to the languages. All of the Ryukyu languages are endangered due to over a century of social and political prejudice against the Ryukyu languages by the Japanese government. 

Some examples of creative Eisa clubs include Ryukyukoku Matsuri Daiko and Chinagu Eisa (based in Hawaiʻi). Ryukyukoku Matsuri Daiko, formed in 1982, was one of the first creative Eisa clubs, and has since expanded to form chapters in mainland Japan, Hawaiʻi, the mainland United States, and other locations with Okinawan populations.[6]Whereas traditionally men would dance Eisa utilizing drums, while women would dance drumless, creative Eisa features many females who choose to dance with drums. 

In addition to having the freedom of dancing to new songs, creative Eisa groups often create their own choreographies, typically using elements of traditional Eisa and ti (karate). 

Since its formation, creative Eisa has been hugely popular in Okinawa, and has also been exported to the Miyako and Yaeyama Islands, Yoron Island(1992)[1] Okinoerabu Island (1993)[5], Kagoshima Prefecture, and to the Kantō and Kansai regions, where people of Okinawan descent concentrated.[7]Creative Eisa has also been exported internationally to virtually anywhere with sizeable Okinawan populations, such as Hawai’i, the continental United States, and South America. 

For many young Ryukyuans in the 21st century, creative Eisa has become an integral part of their cultural identity, providing a vital link between tradition and modern creativity. 

One consequence of the rise of creative Eisa is a crisis in authenticity. In response, youth associations increasingly see their community-based Eisa as Okinawan tradition although the perceived tradition is a result of “growing pains” up to 1970s.

From RKMD Tokyo

http://www.matsuridaiko-tokyo.com/aisatsu-e/

[1] Ichiman-nin Eisa: “Ichiman-nin’’ means 10,000 people. “Ichiman-nin Eisa” is a very famous festival in Japan held by approximately 10,000 Eisa dancers on Kokusaidori, the main street of Naha in Okinawa. Many people from the youth groups gather and perform various sort of traditional and original Eisa styles.

[2] Ryukyu Koku Matsuri Daiko (RKMD): The world’s largest Eisa organization reaching the masses mainly in Okinawa, Japan, and the South America: Peru, Argentina, Brazil, and so on. Ryukyu: “old name of Okinawa”, Koku: “kingdom” or “country,” Matsuri: “festival”, Daiko: “taiko drums”

[3] Shinjuku Eisa festival: This festival is held in Shinjuku, Tokyo every year since 2002. 

[4] Churashima: It means “beautiful islands”, as Okinawa is composed of many beautiful islands.

[5] Ryukyu Project: An organization for the purpose to promote Okinawan culture.

[6] Naha Ohzunahiki: “tag-of-war” event held from June through August on the lunar calendar (July and September on the Gregorian calendar) in Okinawa. The main objective of the event is to pray for good harvest, large catch, rain, and warding off evil, while it is also believed to forecast the fortune of the following year based on the result.

[7] Miruku-munari: The rock music of Okinawa, the lyrics by Daiichi Hirata and the music by Hidekatsu Kamei. It is the famous music in Okinawa, Japan, and South America.
“Miruku” means “the deities of nature” derived from the old Okinawan language, and “munari” is “dance” in Indonesian. This word was coined by Daiichi Hirata. In summary, the meaning of the song is to pray for a good harvest and that, thanks to the brilliant dancing of the deities of nature, we have a bumper harvest. The powerful melody inspires and moves whoever listens to it.

Mirukumunari Lyrics
BY  Hiro
ALBUM  Watashi no Okinawa


No kanji lyrics found.

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Romaji
Added by: Momoka

KUTUSHI MIRKUNU YUGAFUDUSHI SAMI
MIRIKU GANASHI NU URUI MISOOCHI
KUGUKUMUNUDANI UTABIMISETASA
YADU NU YADUKAJI CHINE NU ChiNEKAJI
KAJI MATAAN DOONICCHAI

KUTUSHI INI NU MUITACHI
SUNCHAAMANNCHAA MANMANMANSAKU
NIIDIKI DOUTI
ARIGA UHACHI YA KOUTENGA NASHI NI
KAHEI USAGI TI USAGI TIYU NUKUI
KURA NI CHINCHI KI ASAGI NI CHINCHI KICHIN
AMASOO TITOU WASHI TA WAKAMUNU
AMAZAKIKARAZAKI TARIDUTI
NUDEE ASHIBU SA

KUTUSHI MIRKUNU YUGAFUDUSHI SAMI
MIRIKU GANASHI NU URUI MISOOCHI
KUGUKUMUNUDANI UTABIMISETASA
YADU NU YADUKAJI CHINE NU ChiNEKAJI
KAJI MATAAN DOONICCHAI

KAJI MATAAN DOONICCHAI